King of Barbury - Alan King - Trainer Profile

31-March-2017
31-March-2017 4:53
in General
by Admin

Success stories involving grit and determination in sport are a compelling watch and what often endear certain personalities to the mainstream media. These tales of sports professionals overcoming adversity are what inspire onlookers to achieve their specific dreams and goals whether in life or in sport. One of those inspiring tales is that of Alan King, the resident trainer at Barbury, and a huge supporter of Pointing at this popular venue.

Before becoming a sought-after racehorse trainer, Alan ran a proverbial gauntlet in order to succeed. Born in 1966, he was a farmer's son who found his passion for the sport at an early age. His father supported him every step of the way, until his teenage years, when he went to work at David Nicholson's Condicote yard. Here. a young Alan eventually became Assistant, a position he kept up to the Duke's retirement 15 years later. Great horses like Broadsword, Viking Flagship and Another Coral flew the flag for Nicholson during those vintage years. Sadly Nicholson passed away due to a heart attack nearly a decade after, as reported in Blood Horse

In the late '90s, Alan took over the reins left by Nicholson and began his racing career as a fully-fledged trainer. He groomed horses and jockeys at the famous Jackdaws Castle, where he would follow in the footsteps of his mentor. According to a feature by racing pundit Russell Smith, who also contributes articles on Betfair, his first win came in December 1999, when Mini Moo Min broke the duck at Towcester to win a modest £3,285. BUt within the space of a fortnight after, Alan had established himself as a man with a future with Graded victories at Cheltenham with Relkeel and in Ascot's Long Walk Hurdle and Noel Novices Chase with Anzum and Toto Toscato.

Changes were afoot at Jackdaws though, and on June 1st 2000, Alan, wife Rachel and young family moved to Barbury Castle Stables, a recent acquisition by former telecoms entrepreneur Nigel Bunter. The first winner carrying the suffix A King, Barbury, was Diva in a modest race at Hereford that October. Two years later Stromness gave him his first Aintree meeting winner. The winner machine began to gather momentum, and Alan played a significant hand in the development of the training facility at Barbury, including the Point-to-Point course. 

Alan's career now spans over 1,250 National Hunt winners, including 29 Grade 1s and 15 successes at the Cheltenham Festival, including Voy Por Ustedes in the Queen Mother Champion Chase, Katchit in the 2008 Champion Hurdle, a brace of Arkles and most recently, Uxixandre in the 2015 Ryanair Chase.

Alan epitomizes hard work bringing its own reward. He's made plenty of sacrifices along the way - all successful athletes and trainers do - but he's won the respect and admiration of his contemporaries and the racing world at large for having started on the bottom rung. He'd be the first to admit he doesn't fulfil an orthodox brief of the quintessential sports idol, but he's earned a following from punters and racing fans across the racing community for sheer grit, determination and persistence to make it to the top of hois profession.

Next Event

When?

Sunday November 26 

Where?

Barbury, 3m N of Marlborough, off A346, Jn 15 M4

Latest News

King of Barbury - Alan King - Trainer Profile

31-March-2017
31-March-2017 4:53
in General
by Admin

Success stories involving grit and determination in sport are a compelling watch and what often endear certain personalities to the mainstream media. These tales of sports professionals overcoming adversity are what inspire onlookers to achieve their specific dreams and goals whether in life or in sport. One of those inspiring tales is that of Alan King, the resident trainer at Barbury, and a huge supporter of Pointing at this popular venue.

Before becoming a sought-after racehorse trainer, Alan ran a proverbial gauntlet in order to succeed. Born in 1966, he was a farmer's son who found his passion for the sport at an early age. His father supported him every step of the way, until his teenage years, when he went to work at David Nicholson's Condicote yard. Here. a young Alan eventually became Assistant, a position he kept up to the Duke's retirement 15 years later. Great horses like Broadsword, Viking Flagship and Another Coral flew the flag for Nicholson during those vintage years. Sadly Nicholson passed away due to a heart attack nearly a decade after, as reported in Blood Horse

In the late '90s, Alan took over the reins left by Nicholson and began his racing career as a fully-fledged trainer. He groomed horses and jockeys at the famous Jackdaws Castle, where he would follow in the footsteps of his mentor. According to a feature by racing pundit Russell Smith, who also contributes articles on Betfair, his first win came in December 1999, when Mini Moo Min broke the duck at Towcester to win a modest £3,285. BUt within the space of a fortnight after, Alan had established himself as a man with a future with Graded victories at Cheltenham with Relkeel and in Ascot's Long Walk Hurdle and Noel Novices Chase with Anzum and Toto Toscato.

Changes were afoot at Jackdaws though, and on June 1st 2000, Alan, wife Rachel and young family moved to Barbury Castle Stables, a recent acquisition by former telecoms entrepreneur Nigel Bunter. The first winner carrying the suffix A King, Barbury, was Diva in a modest race at Hereford that October. Two years later Stromness gave him his first Aintree meeting winner. The winner machine began to gather momentum, and Alan played a significant hand in the development of the training facility at Barbury, including the Point-to-Point course. 

Alan's career now spans over 1,250 National Hunt winners, including 29 Grade 1s and 15 successes at the Cheltenham Festival, including Voy Por Ustedes in the Queen Mother Champion Chase, Katchit in the 2008 Champion Hurdle, a brace of Arkles and most recently, Uxixandre in the 2015 Ryanair Chase.

Alan epitomizes hard work bringing its own reward. He's made plenty of sacrifices along the way - all successful athletes and trainers do - but he's won the respect and admiration of his contemporaries and the racing world at large for having started on the bottom rung. He'd be the first to admit he doesn't fulfil an orthodox brief of the quintessential sports idol, but he's earned a following from punters and racing fans across the racing community for sheer grit, determination and persistence to make it to the top of hois profession.

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